Introducing QuickChange Xpress (QCX) – The “Scandalous” RHW Feature So Many Have Wanted

Yesterday (July 12th), I posted a video on YouTube showing something that, up to this point, has been deemed completely off-limits for RealHighway (RHW) development (hence the quotation from Earthbound/Mother 2’s infamous final boss in the title).  For those who haven’t seen it yet, here it is:

Yes, that is basically what it looks like–a full-on pre-fabricated diamond interchange for the RHW, placed in one click.  It’s something we’ve been adamant about not including in the past, as evidenced by question #17 on the FAQ in the first post of the RHW development thread at SC4 Devotion:

 

17.  Will “Maxis-styled” prefab/plop interchanges ever be produced for the RHW?

No.  The massive amount of time required in making one, the size limits imposed on them, the fact that they would duplicate already existing functionality, along with the rigid inflexibility of such setups and the massive number that would have to be made in order to account for all the networks included in the RHW renders the notion of plop interchanges impractical and unworkable.  The QuickChange system is the closest we will come to making full prefabs.

 

This of course, begs the question–what changed?  Believe it or not, the biggest game-changer in this situation was the steady march away from the traditional “static” puzzle pieces, toward FLEX setups, which already permitted the QuickChange system, introduced in NAM 32.  The “official” term I’ve devised for this new full interchange setup is QuickChange Xpress, or QCX–a rather unique acronym, as it includes both a Q and an X (and indirectly pays tribute to Q and X enthusiast and RHW project founder qurlix).  The name represents the fact that it takes what QuickChange brought to the RHW system, and has sped the interchange creation process as fast as it can go.

The traditional pre-fab interchanges for the Maxis Highways are massive static puzzle pieces, which require a lot of Instance IDs (IIDs) in order to function, and as a result, are very tedious, painstaking items to develop.  Had this interchange been developed the conventional “static” way, as this piece is 15×4 with a bumpout on either side in the middle for the Road crossing, we’d be potentially looking at 62 IIDs, plus a lot of tedious exemplar editing, model shifting, and pathing.  Plus, in order to fill demand, we’d need to make versions for several different RHW networks, multiplying development time considerably.  It becomes abundantly clear why RHW pre-fabs requests were vehemently shot down in the past.

However, the QCX is built entirely from existing FLEX pieces, plus the L1 Road Viaduct starters on either side.  The original FLEX pieces themselves are being dropped in place here, just by virtue of using RUL0 to reference their anchor points and filling in the gaps with base network tiles, which RUL2 overrides then handle as needed to form the full interchange.  And as with other, smaller FLEX pieces, we can use the same placeholder dummy IID that’s been around for a decade with the original FLEX piece (the Diagonal Streets from NAM 20 in 2006).  There’s exactly zero new IIDs required.

Nil.  Zilch.  Donut.

No pathing, no exemplars, no model manipulation outside of the preview model (which is by far the most difficult part of making a QCX).

For those of you out there who are RHW power users, this doesn’t mean we’re going to abandon the advanced, modular side of the RHW.  Far from it.  It does, however, open what has long been considered (even by many advanced users) a maddeningly complex system to a much wider audience.  We’ll continue to develop new RHW content, focusing on the traditional, smaller modular pieces, in FLEX form, but now, we’ll also look at ways to assemble these FLEX items into larger QCX setups, that can get anyone up and running with the RHW, which takes surprisingly little time.  About 30 minutes elapsed between when I started making that first functioning QCX prototype and recording that video.

The QCX in the video is by no means the final design, and we are looking at some potential improvements to it, trying to find the right balance of ease-of-use, realism, and in-game efficiency.  Some of the improvements being considered may necessitate pushing the rollout of QCX out until NAM 36 (NAM 35 is the version currently in development), but rest assured, the RHW will soon be a far more approachable component of the NAM.

-Tarkus

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